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Frances Hodgson Burnett - The Secret Garden

Frances Hodgson Burnett

The Secret Garden

This book was initially published in serial format starting in the autumn of 1910, and was first published in its entirety in 1911. It is now one of Burnett's most popular novels, and is considered to be a classic of English children's literature. Several stage and film adaptations have been produced.

Thomas Hardy - Far from the Madding Crowd

Thomas Hardy

Far from the Madding Crowd

The title is apt, as the life of the book's heroine, Bathsheba Everdene, living in the quiet rural village of Weatherbury is indeed disrupted by the «madding crowd».

Charles Dickens - A Christmas Carol

Charles Dickens

A Christmas Carol

A Christmas Carol tells the story of a bitter old miser named Ebenezer Scrooge and his transformation into a gentler, kindlier man after visitations by the ghost of his former business partner Jacob Marley and the Ghosts of Christmas Past, Present and Yet to Come.

Lucy Maud Montgomery - Anne of Green Gables

Lucy Maud Montgomery

Anne of Green Gables

Written for all ages, it has been considered a children's novel since the mid-twentieth century. It recounts the adventures of Anne Shirley, an 11-year-old orphan girl who is mistakenly sent to Matthew and Marilla Cuthbert, a middle-aged brother and sister who had intended to adopt a boy to help them on their farm in Prince Edward Island. The novel recounts how Anne makes her way with the Cuthberts, in school, and within the town.

Charles Dickens - Great Expectations

Charles Dickens

Great Expectations

The action of the story takes place from Christmas Eve, 1812, when the protagonist is about seven years old, to the winter of 1840.

Kenneth Grahame - The Wind in the Willows

Kenneth Grahame

The Wind in the Willows

The Wind in the Willows is a children's novel by Kenneth Grahame, first published in 1908. Alternately slow moving and fast paced, it focuses on four anthropomorphised animals in a pastoral version of England. The novel is notable for its mixture of mysticism, adventure, morality, and camaraderie and celebrated for its evocation of the nature of the Thames valley.

Anonymous  - A Night in a Moorish Harem

Anonymous

A Night in a Moorish Harem

A Night in a Moorish Harem is an erotic novella anonymously written and narrated by the main character, Lord George Herbert in 1896. It recounts a night spent by a shipwrecked British sailor in a Moroccan harem with nine concubines of different nationalities. The harem topos is a typical example of the privileged location and also an example of Western literary orientalism.

Emily Bronte - Wuthering Heights

Emily Bronte

Wuthering Heights

Wuthering Heights is Emily Brontë's only novel. It was first published in 1847 under the pseudonym Ellis Bell, and a posthumous second edition was edited by her sister Charlotte. The name of the novel comes from the Yorkshire manor on the moors on which the story centres (as an adjective, wuthering is a Yorkshire word referring to turbulent weather). The narrative tells the tale of the all-encompassing and passionate, yet thwarted, love between Heathcliff and Catherine Earnshaw, and how this unresolved passion eventually destroys them and many around them.

Fyodor Dostoevsky - The Gambler

Fyodor Dostoevsky

The Gambler

That's our Life? -- The Game The Gambler is a novel about a youngish tutor in the employment of a formerly wealthy Russian civil servant.


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